Date:         Wed, 7 Aug 1996 09:01:28 -0400
From: bonniev 
Subject:      Legends, Lies, and Local History
To: Multiple recipients of list WORDS-L 

I sat under the clock at the Village Green yesterday morning at 10 a.m.
waiting for the tour to begin.  But, alas, I was the only taker.  I told the
nice man that I was  a local and he needn't do the tour just for me.  I
would come back another day when there were more takers.

So he and I sat on the grass and talked for awhile.  He knows all the people
who started Acadia.net.  He remembers (this is a guy younger than I) twenty
years ago when College of the Atlantic just started and had only 43
students.  Evidently, the winters in Bar Harbor were different then.  There
were very few people around and they truly took care of one another.

If someone's care broke down, everyone chipped in $2 and helped him get it
fixed.  There was  big cardboard box keep someplace that you put your old
clothes in.  Everyone ended up wearing each other's clothing.

Now the college has grown, Jackson Lab has grown, and the town is quiet but
no longer comatose in the winter.

After we talked for a half hour or so, Richard, said he could at least walk
with me over to St. Saviour and show me the Tiffany windows.  That is
usually part of his wife's tour but he had learned the Church to show it to
a friend.

On the three block walk over to the church Richard pointed out to me that he
is the author of _Bar Harbor Police Beat_.  I had just bought  that book at
Port in a Storm Bookstore last week.  I would have asked him to sign my copy
but I bought it pre-signed.  The book is funny stories about Bar Harbor's
Finest.  From the back cover:  "Combine  low-income locals, fabulously rich
summer people, eccentic tourists, and ordinary decent folks (like you and
me).  Add hectic summers and long New England winters.  Stir together on the
most beautiful island in America, until everything is brught to a Boil.
Thank goodness the police are out there to Serve."

To be continued...

Paradise Found          bonniev@acadia.net

Date:         Wed, 7 Aug 1996 09:01:30 -0400
From: bonniev 
Subject:      The windows of St. Saviour
To: Multiple recipients of list WORDS-L 

So Richard and I got to the Church.  First, on a query from me, he showed me
the Thrift Shop.  Then he showed me a few of the graves in the graveyard
next to the church.  Then we walked inside to see the Tiffany windows.
Stunning.  Very nice church, albeit Episcopalian.

My favorite window was given by his children in memory of Clarence Cook
Little who was President of the University of Maine and of Michigan--Ann
Arbor.  More important, locally, he was the founding director of The Jackson
Laboratory and Senior Warden of St. Saviour.  The window depicts St. Luke
the Physician but in a corner it has two grey mice!  The Jackson Lab
building is also in the window along with research slides in the background
glass.  Very clever.

Two other windows have the hills of Acadia clevely woven into the
background.  One long Tiffany window was stolen right out of the church in
1988.

The church was consecrated in 1879.  It was very quickly added on to when it
became the favored place of worship by the rich and famous.  Joseph
Pullitzer's daughter was married there.  Another famous person's wedding
involved bringing up the Boston Symphony Orchestra because the father of the
bride felt the chruch organ needed some accompaniment.

The altar is Italian marble and was brought over in one piece by boat.  In
1908 artwork was commissioned  in the form of an angel holding an open book
on her back.  This is the lectern.  This piece of art caused comment and
scandal in the Boston Globe at the time.  It seems the good fathers of
Boston felt Bar Harbor had gone a bit far in depicting an angel in female
form with the clear outline of one knee showing through her robe.

Some of this I learned from Richard.   Most of it I learned after Richard
had left.  I visited the Thrift Shop and then went back into the church to
take a closer look at the windows.  I discovered that someone is on duty
there from 11 until 3 to give tours.  Our church tour guide was quite nice.
But then another, even older man, showed up to aide the tour. ... ...

Paradise Found          bonniev@acadia.net

Date:         Wed, 7 Aug 1996 09:01:31 -0400
From: bonniev 
Subject:      It's a small town
To: Multiple recipients of list WORDS-L 

The 78 year old man who was learning to be a church tour guide was the
highlight of the day.  Turns out he is the former father-in-law of the woman
who sold us our house.

He has been coming to Bar Harbor in the summer for the last 50 years.  He
distinctly remembers the year after the 1947 fire when much of the island
burned down. I could have talked to him all day.  He is a PhD pyschologist
who has worked for NIH and other government agencies.  But always a
condition of his employment was that he could work at Jackson Lab for the
summer.  No summer in Bar Harbor, no job.

He and his wife own a house across the street from the very strange swimming
pool I was telling you about earlier this week.  It is a wading pool for
little children.  They do indeed freeze it in the winter and use it for an
ice skating rink.  Yeeessss!

So I talked to this delightful man for a long time.  Then I walked deeper
into town and bought myself a strawberry ice cream cone.  After startling a
fellow pedestrian when I jumped to catch the falling scoop of ice cream
after a particulary vigorous lick, I walked down to the tide-exposed bar and
washed my hands off in the Atlantic Ocean.  Then I walked back up the hill
and home.

A very satisfying morning in Paradise.

Paradise Found          bonniev@acadia.net