Date: Sun, 1 Dec 1996 09:33:42 +0000
From: "Espen S. Ore" <Espen.Ore@HD.UIB.NO>
Subject: WHTMIL 1
To: Multiple recipients of list WORDS-L <WORDS-L@UGA.CC.UGA.EDU>

This will, I hope, be sent tomorrow. I am in my Bayswater hotel and have found out that the British Museum and the National Gallery, the two museums I really would have liked to visit, don't open until 2.30 pm on a Sunday. So before lunch I plan to walk through Hyde Park and visit the Science Museum, and then take the BM after lunch.

My hotel room feels very British in that it has a water boiler and the necessary stuff for making a cup of tea or coffee. On the other hand there is no minibar in the room. In fact I have never had a room with a minibar in England. But they should exist, Umberto Eco has written a very funny piece which, among other things, mentions a Swedish smoked salmon and a London hotelroom minibar.

I wonder who invented the tradition of serving "continental breakfast" as part of the room price while a real (in this case "English") breakfast is extra. Is there a small group of countries (Norway-Sweden-Denmatk, Finland, Iceland, the Faroes, Germany, Austria, Russia, and maybe other Eastern European countries) in the world where one gets a *real* breakfast as part of the room price? I remember that the fairly expensive hotel I stayed in in Washington DC claimed that they served a complementary breakfast. That was just some sweet stuff and even less satisfying than the toast that was part of the "continental breakfast" I had today.

espen

Date: Wed, 4 Dec 1996 14:11:38 +0100
From: "Espen S. Ore" <Espen.Ore@HD.UIB.NO>
Subject: WHTMIL (2)
To: Multiple recipients of list WORDS-L <WORDS-L@UGA.CC.UGA.EDU>

The Science Museum in London was very good. It was different from the one in Boston, so they should maybe not be compared, but if I were to compare this is the best.

Later on Sunday I met up with one of the participants of our meeting who was staying at the same hotel as I. We found a nice pub in Queensway where they had good cider and good beer. Scrumpy Jack is dangerous in that it is stronger than it tastes.

On Monday before our meeting I borrowed Willards IP-number and network connection. It didn't help much, though, since the connections between Norway and the UK where so slow that Eudora timed out all the time.

Our meeting was very international: Me, one Finn, one German, One Italian, two USers where one had grown up in Africa and has lived in London for quite a few years and the other (Willard) has lived in Toronto before coming here), and three real, genuine Brits.

On Tuesday we peeled of group members until the last two of us had a final Scrumpy Jack at the pub in Terminal 1 before I walked over to Terminal 3 to go back to Bergen.

Today I have seen my dentist and have recieved a penicillium cure which I have started now. I hope it helps for my Statistics exam tomorrow.

espen